PREVIOUS ARTICLE ALL CONTENTS Next ARTICLE

Sunni City: Tripoli from Islamist Utopia to the Lebanese ‘Revolution’, Tine Gade

Reviewed by Kelly A. Stedem
 

Tripoli, Lebanon's second largest city, is frequently described as a bastion of religious radicalization and Political Islamism. Sunni City: Tripoli from Islamist Utopic to the Lebanese ‘Revolution’ challenges established narratives—particularly Bernard Rougier's The Sunni Tragedy in the Middle East: Northern Lebanon from al-Qaeda to ISIS—that Sunni Islam's lack of religious hierarchy led to the fragmentation of Sunni political authority and thus gave way to the growth of Islamist movements within the city. Tine Gade instead argues that Tripoli's politics are the result of governance failures by the Lebanese state and local elites. She offers a richly detailed, bottom-up perspective of the influence that sectarianism, clientelism, foreign influence, and state neglect have had on Tripolitan politics over the course of a century.

Gade employs the concept of city corporatism to show how Tripoli has had a unique character—one that is based upon regional pride, antistate sentiments, and an increasingly sectarian character. Sunni City first shows how early political elites, specifically the Karami family, relied upon clientelism to gain support during the early years of the Lebanese state. In doing so, political parties never became as well established in Tripoli as they did elsewhere i

To continue reading, see options above.

About PSQ's Editor

ROBERT Y. SHAPIRO

Full Access

Join the Academy of Political Science and automatically receive Political Science Quarterly.

CONFERENCES & EVENTS

A Purple Agenda For The Next Four Years
June 20, 2024
7:30 p.m.–9:00 p.m. ET
WEBINAR

MORE ABOUT THIS EVENT VIEW ALL EVENTS

Editor’s spotlight

Virtual Issue

Introduction: Black Power and the Civil Rights Agendas of Charles V. Hamilton
Marylena Mantas and Robert Y. Shapiro

MORE ABOUT THIS TOPIC

Search the Archives

Publishing since 1886, PSQ is the most widely read and accessible scholarly journal with distinguished contributors such as: Lisa Anderson, Robert A. Dahl, Samuel P. Huntington, Robert Jervis, Joseph S. Nye, Jr., Theda Skocpol, Woodrow Wilson

view additional issues

Most read

Articles | Book reviews

Understanding the Bush Doctrine
Robert Jervis

The Study of Administration
Woodrow Wilson

Notes on Roosevelt's "Quarantine" Speech
Dorothy Borg

view all

New APS Book

China in a World of Great Power Competition   CHINA IN A WORLD OF GREAT POWER COMPETITION

About US

Academy of Political Science

The Academy of Political Science, promotes objective, scholarly analyses of political, social, and economic issues. Through its conferences and publications APS provides analysis and insight into both domestic and foreign policy issues.

Political Science Quarterly

With neither an ideological nor a partisan bias, PSQ looks at facts and analyzes data objectively to help readers understand what is really going on in national and world affairs.

Stay Connected

newsstand locator
About APS