pp. 153-155

Political Peoplehood: The Role of Values, Interests, and Identities, Rogers M. Smith

Reviewed by Ken I. Kersch
   Facebook

   Twitter

   E-mail
 

In this latest installment of his effort to articulate a comprehensive framework for understanding civic membership and realistically achievable, normatively desirable principles for the relationship between people and political groupings demanding allegiance against other groups, Rogers M. Smith weighs, digests, synthesizes, refines, reflects, theorizes, and proposes. The core political question of “who governs” (p. 6) raises foundational questions concerning “who can make authoritative decisions within [the group] and who can belong to it” (p. 7). Answering these requires studying “the processes through which groups are constructed, maintained, challenged, and changed” (p. 8). Smith’s theoretical preoccupation here is with “coercively constituted identities” (p. 263). His policy preoccupation is with immigrants and refugees and those positioned to welcome, manage, or exclude them.

Smith starts by defining and theorizing the full spectrum of “weak and narrow” to “strong and wide” conceptions of political peoplehood, including, but not limited to, nationalisms (p. 39). These “are not natural . . . [but] created by asymmetrical interactions between potential leaders and . . . members.” “[B]oth . . . have agency”—they are engaged in an “always ongoing

To continue reading, see options above.

More by This Author

Constitutional Myths: What We Get Wrong and How to Get it Right, Ray Raphael
Reviewed by Ken I. Kersch

The Supreme Court and the American Elite, 1789–2008, Lucas A. Powe, Jr.
Reviewed by Ken I. Kersch

Welfare and the Constitution, Sotirios A. Barber
Reviewed by Ken I. Kersch

Full Faith and Credit for Same-Sex Marriages?, Ken I. Kersch


About PSQ's Editor

Demetrios James Caraley

Full Access

Join the Academy of Political Science and automatically receive Political Science Quarterly.

From the Archives

Developments in Beijing

The Varieties of Collective Financial Statecraft: The BRICS and China
LESLIE ELLIOTT ARMIJO

Chinese Thinking on the South China Sea and the Future of Regional Security
FENG ZHANG

Search the Archives

Publishing since 1886, PSQ is the most widely read and accessible scholarly journal with distinguished contributors such as: Lisa Anderson, Robert A. Dahl, Samuel P. Huntington, Robert Jervis, Joseph S. Nye, Jr., Theda Skocpol, Woodrow Wilson

view additional issues

EARLY VIEW

Coming in Winter 2017-18

Disruption, Demonization, Deliverance, and Norm Destruction: The Rhetorical Signature of Donald J. Trump

KATHLEEN HALL JAMIESON and DORON TAUSSIG examine Donald Trump’s rhetoric during the presidential campaign and through his first 100 days in office. They argue that Trump’s “rhetorical signature,” which distinguishes him from his predecessors, certified Trump’s authenticity as a candidate of change and now complicate his ability to govern.

VIEW THE ARTICLE

Most read

Articles | Book reviews

Understanding the Bush Doctrine
Robert Jervis

The Study of Administration
Woodrow Wilson

Notes on Roosevelt's "Quarantine" Speech
Dorothy Borg

view all

New APS Book

Continuing Issues in U.S. National Security Policy   CONTINUING ISSUES IN U.S. NATIONAL SECURITY POLICY

About US

Academy of Political Science

The Academy of Political Science, promotes objective, scholarly analyses of political, social, and economic issues. Through its conferences and publications APS provides analysis and insight into both domestic and foreign policy issues.

Political Science Quarterly

With neither an ideological nor a partisan bias, PSQ looks at facts and analyzes data objectively to help readers understand what is really going on in national and world affairs.

Stay Connected
newsstand locator
About APS